Chrissy Clary

ponder. conspire. digitize.

Category: Creativity (page 2 of 3)

Love, Choice and Listening: Tips for reducing frustration in the design process

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I had an employee once who diligently worked on each design and architecture plan. She functioned as part architect and part UX strategist for the team. Working from home, she would spend hours perfecting one unadulterated proposal. The problem came in when she would present her plan to the customer. The meetings dissolved into an agitated debate over best practices and customer wants.

Often she had not spent much time hashing out needs and wants of the customer. Instead she trusted only what she learned from books and experts. She would become agitated with the customer and their stupidity. How could they not realize the gift she had just presented? Did they not understand the amount of time and knowledge that had been invested?

This is not a unique story in the business of communication design, but here are a few ideas for overcoming.

  1. Don’t fall in love with your work. For the creative type that can be easer said than done. But you will find, in the long run, that if you are open to critique and criticism your work will improve expediently. Everyone needs a good editor and if you are open to the feedback of both experts and laymen your perspective will be enhanced along with your talent. Yes it does sting a little, especially when you are first starting out, but over time your skin will become thicker.
  2. Always design two options. Not 3 or 15, just two. To many options can paralyze your decision maker. Design two options that you are happy with and proud of. When you present the two options to the customer they may feel like they have some control and voice in the design process leading to increased buy in. Together you can work through both designs and select the best bits from each. Designing a second option is also important for stretching yourself as a designer. While you may think the first design was perfect, you may be pleasantly surprised at what you come up with when you force yourself to create a second version.

For more on choosing: Too Many Choices: A Problem That Can Paralyze, written by Alina Tugend and published by The New York Times

  1. For goodness sake, you are not designing the thing for you so listen to the people who hired you. And maybe don’t just listen, watch and observe a little too. Get up close and cozy with your customer’s process, who they are and what they need. It is your job to create a solution to their problem so make sure you fully understand the problem and then apply your expert opinion and best practices to that problem. Just don’t forget that while your understanding of UX or communications may far exceed theirs, their understanding of the business they run and the needs of their customers far exceeded yours.

More on listening: Why You Should Listen to the Customer, by Braden Kowitz, published by The Wall Street Journal

Creativity is hard work…

Sometimes we toil long hours and sometime the ideas just pop into our heads, like divine inspiration.  Brainstorming and white-boarding can help, but sometimes letting go a little is what you or your staff need in order to get the creative juices flowing. If you manage a creative workforce don’t forget to nurture their brilliance by allowing a little daydreaming from time to time.

This interesting infographic helps to remind me that while it ain’t digging ditches, it ain’t always easy either.

The path to creativity

The path to creativity

— Graphic borrowed from VirusComix.com
— Shared by Shelley H. Carson, PhD, Department of Psychology Harvard University

What the heck are technical requirements and how do I get some?

So, you want to build a website or an application, and some tech/geek is at your door asking for technical requirements. What do you do?

Don’t panic.

A project manager with strong technical skills could help you navigate the task, but just in case you find yourself in a new found project manager role, here are four tips:

1technical-requirements21. Keep an eye on the prize
The key to getting the technical requirements right is to focus on your project goals first.

Clearly identify what your outcomes should be and get feedback from your stakeholders. If you don’t know what your goals or outcomes should be, your project will be all over the place and it will have a hard time getting off the ground.

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What the heck is a Wiki?

Part of the problem here is that people are jumping into online marketing and having to deal with new terminology. Here is a quick rundown of what’s what and how to use it.

Blogs: Formally Web Logs are online journals. Items are posted and displayed in the sequence written. Popular free platforms include Google Blog Spot and WordPress. Blogs are powerful tools for website updating and management allowing the owner to login and post, bypassing a dependence on developers. Blogs appeared in the 1990s and have continued to grow in popularity ever since. Twitter is a type of blog called a Micro-blog working much like any other blog but only allowing users to post 140 characters.

Forums: Online communities or discussion boards. Users who share similar interest congregate online to discuss targeted topics. Forums are an important part of any online marketing program. Because the subjects are niche oriented a business can communicate with users about issues related to topics the business deals with. Word of caution, do not hard sell anything in forums they are often moderated and users will reject that approach. Start by simply participating in the conversation and encouraging two-way communication.

Wikis: A website powered by a database of information updated by online users. These systems allow the easy creation and editing of topical information — off topic information may be removed. Don’t try to post online advertisements about your businesses, but do write about things you are an expert on. According to Wikipeda, wiki sites first appeared in the mid 1990s.

Video and photo sharing: Sites like YouTube and Flickr allow the free and easy viral sharing of videos and photos. These files tend to be quite large and can eat storage space. When information “goes viral” it means it has gained widespread popularity through the process of Internet sharing.

Social news: Sites like Digg, launched in 2004, allow users to submit and vote on links or news stories. Votes from the community determine the placement or visibility of content submitted, those with higher ratings receiving higher placement. The social news phenomenon has led to the emergence of news aggregator sites where stories are collected and presented based on interest or topic. Marketers are free to share articles they write or articles found on other sites.

Mobile applications: These are little computer programs for your phone. iPhone is perhaps the most well know device using applications. Many of these programs are the quick, on the go link to social networking platforms. A site like Urbanspoon allows users to find a restaurant on the go. It is important, epically for businesses like attractions and restaurants, that the information on these apps is checked for accuracy. There is also an opportunity to react to bad comments and businesses are free to do so on some but should avoid nasty debates. Remember the Internet allows two-way communication, use it.

The power is in the connection

There are few things less stressful than being on deadline and unable to reach a source. As I frantically tried to dig up Ned Harper’s phone number so I could finish a story I thought what the heck let’s try Facebook.

I found Harper and shot off a quick urgent message. In less than two minutes my phone rang.

The power of the Internet is not in the technology or the wires it is in the immediate connection of humans.

It was obvious by the overwhelming turnout at a social networking workshop held over the summer, presented by the Small Business Development Center, that the Internet is rapidly changing the face of local business. There is no question about if a business should participate in social media, it now it is a matter of how.

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